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Continually optimizing the airpower machine

Security forces Airmen are experts in base defense and provide support to the airfield and mission partners through offensive and defensive postures, quick response force capabilities, and fly away security teams that support C-130 missions to dangerous locations.

U.S. Air Force C-130J Super Hercules pilots assigned to the 774th Expeditionary Airlift Squadron starts their pre-flight checklist on at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, Nov. 11 2018. The C-130J is the prime transport for airdropping troops and equipment into hostile areas. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Kaylee Dubois)

Aviation Machinist Mate 3rd Class Tareik Ellis from the Electronic Attack Squadron 135 (VAQ-135) “Black Ravens” conducts maintenance on an EA-18G Growler, Oct. 30, 2018, at Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar. The electronic warfare aircraft has electronic attack, jamming, and satellite communication capabilities as well as communication countermeasures. VAQ-135 will replace VMAQ-2, which operated EA-6B Prowlers. VAQ-135 is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations in support of naval operations to ensure maritime stability and security in the Central Region, connecting the Mediterranean and the Pacific through the western Indian Ocean and three strategic choke points. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Christopher Hubenthal)

Aviation Machinist Mate 3rd Class Tareik Ellis from the Electronic Attack Squadron 135 (VAQ-135) “Black Ravens” conducts maintenance on an EA-18G Growler, Oct. 30, 2018, at Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar. The electronic warfare aircraft has electronic attack, jamming, and satellite communication capabilities as well as communication countermeasures. VAQ-135 will replace VMAQ-2, which operated EA-6B Prowlers. VAQ-135 is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations in support of naval operations to ensure maritime stability and security in the Central Region, connecting the Mediterranean and the Pacific through the western Indian Ocean and three strategic choke points. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Christopher Hubenthal)

C-130 aircrew delivers combat supplies through air drop

A 746th Expeditionary Airlift Squadron (EAS) loadmaster prepares to airdrop a load of supplies in support of Operation Inherent Resolve (OIR), Nov 14, 2018. The 746th EAS empowers OIR and the fight against the Islamic State group by providing mission critical airdrop, personnel transportation and resupply capabilities to U.S. and Coalition forces conducting operations in support of OIR. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jordan Castelan)

A pilot and crew chief prepare an F-16 Fighting Falcon for take off.

Lt. Gen. Joseph Guastella, Combined Forces Air Component Commander, and Airman 1st Class Cody Ervin, 55th Expeditionary Fighter Squadron crew chief, perform pre-flight checks on an F-16 Fighting Falcon at an undisclosed location in Southwest Asia, Oct. 27, 2018. The 55th EFS recently deployed to the 407th Air Expeditionary Group from Shaw Air Force Base, South Carolina in support of Operation Inherent Resolve. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Dana J. Cable)

C-130 aircrew delivers combat supplies through air drop

A 746th Expeditionary Airlift Squadron (EAS) loadmaster observes a load of supplies as they fall to the ground in support of Operation Inherent Resolve (OIR), Nov 14, 2018. The 746th EAS empowers OIR and the fight against the Islamic State group by providing mission critical airdrop, personnel transportation and resupply capabilities to U.S. and Coalition forces conducting operations in support of OIR. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jordan Castelan)

380th Expeditionary Maintenance Group Crash Damaged or Disabled Aircraft Recovery team members participate in familiarization training on a KC-10 Extender at Al Dhafra Air Base, United Arab Emirates, Nov. 21, 2018. The CDDAR team is not only responsible for responding to the aircraft assigned to ADAB, but all aircraft in the U.S. Air Forces Central Command area of responsibility. The AFCENT AOR ranges from the top of Uzbekistan near the Aral Sea, all the way to the southern tip of Yemen – spanning across 20 Central and Southwest Asian countries. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Mya M. Crosby)

380th Expeditionary Maintenance Group Crash Damaged or Disabled Aircraft Recovery team members participate in familiarization training on a KC-10 Extender at Al Dhafra Air Base, United Arab Emirates, Nov. 21, 2018. The CDDAR team is not only responsible for responding to the aircraft assigned to ADAB, but all aircraft in the U.S. Air Forces Central Command area of responsibility. The AFCENT AOR ranges from the top of Uzbekistan near the Aral Sea, all the way to the southern tip of Yemen – spanning across 20 Central and Southwest Asian countries. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Mya M. Crosby)

AL UDEID AIR BASE, Qatar --

U.S. Air Forces Central Command published its November Airpower Summary today. The summary reflects airpower operations throughout the month in the U.S. Central Command area of responsibility.

Aircraft assigned to the CFACC are flown to support operations across a 20 nation AOR and produce about 2,000 sorties a week. As a part of NATO’s Resolute Support Mission in November, Afghan Air Force leaders met with Train Advise Assist Command Air advisors to decide on their air force’s improvement of command and control.

In support of Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve, professionally-applied airpower continued to provide ground forces clearing the remnants of ISIS within the Middle Euphrates River Valley with precision strike, battlespace awareness, mobility and agile combat support.

The airpower summary is online at the following link: Airpower Summary - Nov. 2018

Operation Freedom’s Sentinel in Afghanistan
In November, aircraft assigned to the CFACC flew 707 strike sorties and released 841 weapons in support of Operation Freedom’s Sentinel. Intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance aircraft flew 1,176 sorties enabling data collection, analysis, and target development.
Airlifters flew 937 sorties, just as they did in October. As well, they executed one C-130 airdrop. Tankers flew 462 sorties and offloaded 20 million pounds of fuel to 1,626 receivers, totaling 17,129 refuelings this year. Finally, 5,795 short tons of cargo were delivered and 12,433 personnel were transported by our mobility team this month.

As a part of NATO’s Resolute Support Mission in November, Afghan Air Force leaders met with Train Advise Assist Command Air advisors multiple times to determine a way-ahead to improve their air force’s command and control structure. For the past two months, coalition and Afghan forces worked together to develop recommendations to enhance the command and control construct for better utilization of AAF assets in support of the Afghan National Defense and Security Forces mission. The shura resulted in AAF leadership endorsing the proposed command and control improvement plan.

Next, Afghans are beginning to work through implementation details stemming from the shura to achieve further integration of their air and ground forces. This is another example of Afghan led solutions but also the country’s military further refining its own joint interoperability.

Operation Inherent Resolve in Iraq and Syria
U.S. and Coalition airpower supported Combined Joint Task Force-Operation Inherent Resolve and Syrian Democratic Forces as they worked to clear the remaining ISIS forces in the Middle Euphrates River Valley flying 1,335 strike sorties and releasing 1,424 weapons. As of November, ISIS was contained to less than one percent of the ground they once controlled, and airpower continued enabling Coalition and partner forces to close in on the final remnants of the terror group. Nearly eight million Iraqis and Syrians have been liberated from ISIS.

Manned and unmanned ISR aircraft flew 659 sorties, supporting thorough and deliberate targeting and strike processes to strike ISIS forces and minimize the impact of operations on civilian populations and infrastructure.

Tankers flew 767 sorties in November, providing 42 million pounds of fuel to 4,334 receivers, extending range and loiter time over operating areas.

Airlifters flew 533 sorties, delivering 2,827 short tons of cargo and transported 3,939 passengers. C-130s flew 11 airdrop missions weighing a total of 248,930 pounds, contributing to the 558,970 pounds of supplies airdropped this year. This increase was due to poor weather throughout the region which required flexible airpower to overcome poor conditions on the ground.