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Longest Blood Moon eclipse soars over Bagram

Blood Moon lunar Eclipse 2018

A sequence of the Blood Moon lunar eclipse photos were taken over Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, July 27, 2018. While lunar eclipses occur sporadically throughout the year, this particular one was the longest occurring eclipse in the 21st century. This was only feasible because the moon was near it’s farthest point from Earth and orbiting slowly, essentially making it take longer to travel through the Earth’s shadow. The Earth was also near its farthest point from the sun, making Earth’s shadow appear larger. The next total lunar eclipse will be Jan. 21, 2019 and will be visible to North America. (U.S. Air Force Illustration by Staff Sgt. Kristin High)

Blood Moon lunar Eclipse 2018

A Blood Moon lunar eclipse is seen with Mars over Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, July 27, 2018. A lunar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes directly behind Earth and into its shadow. This can occur only when the Sun, Earth, and the Moon are aligned exactly or very closely so, with the planet in between. While lunar eclipses occur sporadically throughout the year, this particular one was the longest occurring eclipse in the 21st century. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Kristin High)

Blood Moon lunar Eclipse 2018

The moon is seen after the lunar eclipse recedes over Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, July 27, 2018. During this phase, Earth's umbra, or shadow's dark core, starts moving away from the moon's surface and the moon becomes visible again. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Kristin High)

BAGRAM AIRFIELD, Afghanistan -- A sequence of the Blood Moon lunar eclipse photos were taken over Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, July 27, 2018. While lunar eclipses occur sporadically throughout the year, this particular one was the longest occurring eclipse in the 21st century. This was only feasible because the moon was near its farthest point from Earth and orbiting slowly, essentially making it take longer to travel through the Earth’s shadow. The Earth was also near its farthest point from the sun, making Earth’s shadow appear larger. The next total lunar eclipse will be Jan. 21, 2019 and will be visible to North America. (U.S. Air Force Illustration by Staff Sgt. Kristin High)