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187th Fighter Wing deploys the 100th Fighter Squadron

An F-16 Fighting Falcon from the 100th Fighter Squadron arrives at the 407th Air Expeditionary Group in Southwest Asia, Oct. 16, 2017. In an air combat role, the F-16's maneuverability and combat radius exceed that of all potential threat fighter aircraft. It can locate targets in all weather conditions and detect low flying aircraft in radar ground clutter. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Sean Martin/Released)

An F-16 Fighting Falcon from the 100th Fighter Squadron arrives at the 407th Air Expeditionary Group in Southwest Asia, Oct. 16, 2017. In an air combat role, the F-16's maneuverability and combat radius exceed that of all potential threat fighter aircraft. It can locate targets in all weather conditions and detect low flying aircraft in radar ground clutter. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Sean Martin/Released)

U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. J.C. Baxley, 100th Fighter Squadron crew chief, performs a pre flight inspection on an F-16 Fighting Falcon at the 407th Air Expeditionary Group in Southwest Asia, Oct. 18, 2017. Aircraft Maintenance is responsible for generation of assigned aircraft. Aircraft generation is the cumulative effort required to service, inspect, maintain, launch, and recover assigned aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Sean Martin/Released)

U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. J.C. Baxley, 100th Fighter Squadron crew chief, performs a pre flight inspection on an F-16 Fighting Falcon at the 407th Air Expeditionary Group in Southwest Asia, Oct. 18, 2017. Aircraft Maintenance is responsible for generation of assigned aircraft. Aircraft generation is the cumulative effort required to service, inspect, maintain, launch, and recover assigned aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Sean Martin/Released)

U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. J.C. Baxley, 100th Fighter Squadron crew chief, performs a pre-flight inspection on an F-16 Fighting Falcon at the 407th Air Expeditionary Group in Southwest Asia, Oct. 18, 2017. Aircraft Maintenance is responsible for generation of assigned aircraft. Aircraft generation is the cumulative effort required to service, inspect, maintain, launch, and recover assigned aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Sean Martin/Released)

U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. J.C. Baxley, 100th Fighter Squadron crew chief, performs a pre-flight inspection on an F-16 Fighting Falcon at the 407th Air Expeditionary Group in Southwest Asia, Oct. 18, 2017. Aircraft Maintenance is responsible for generation of assigned aircraft. Aircraft generation is the cumulative effort required to service, inspect, maintain, launch, and recover assigned aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Sean Martin/Released)

U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. William Tittsworth, 100th Fighter Squadron F-16 Fighting Falcon crew chief, performs post flight procedures at the 407th Air Expeditionary Group in Southwest Asia, Oct. 16, 2017. Aircraft Maintenance is responsible for generation of assigned aircraft. Aircraft generation is the cumulative effort required to service, inspect, maintain, launch, and recover assigned aircraft.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Sean Martin/Released)

U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. William Tittsworth, 100th Fighter Squadron F-16 Fighting Falcon crew chief, performs post flight procedures at the 407th Air Expeditionary Group in Southwest Asia, Oct. 16, 2017. Aircraft Maintenance is responsible for generation of assigned aircraft. Aircraft generation is the cumulative effort required to service, inspect, maintain, launch, and recover assigned aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Sean Martin/Released)

U.S. Air Force Airmen from the 100th Fighter Squadron walk to their aircraft, F-16 Fighting Falcons, at the 407th Air Expeditionary Group in Southwest Asia, Oct. 18, 2017. In an air combat role, the F-16's maneuverability and combat radius exceed that of all potential threat fighter aircraft. It can locate targets in all weather conditions and detect low flying aircraft in radar ground clutter. In an air-to-surface role, the F-16 can fly more than 500 miles, deliver its weapons with superior accuracy, defend itself against enemy aircraft and return to its starting point. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Sean Martin/Released)

U.S. Air Force Airmen from the 100th Fighter Squadron walk to their aircraft, F-16 Fighting Falcons, at the 407th Air Expeditionary Group in Southwest Asia, Oct. 18, 2017. In an air combat role, the F-16's maneuverability and combat radius exceed that of all potential threat fighter aircraft. It can locate targets in all weather conditions and detect low flying aircraft in radar ground clutter. In an air-to-surface role, the F-16 can fly more than 500 miles, deliver its weapons with superior accuracy, defend itself against enemy aircraft and return to its starting point. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Sean Martin/Released)

U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. J.C. Baxley (left) and Senior Airman Logan Hanea, 100th Fighter Squadron crew chiefs, remove the travel pod from an F-16 Fighting Falcon at the 407th Air Expeditionary Group in Southwest Asia, Oct. 18, 2017. Travel pods are repurposed fuel tanks converted for pilot cargo storage during long flights, typically cross country or deployments. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Sean Martin/Released)

U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. J.C. Baxley (left) and Senior Airman Logan Hanea, 100th Fighter Squadron crew chiefs, remove the travel pod from an F-16 Fighting Falcon at the 407th Air Expeditionary Group in Southwest Asia, Oct. 18, 2017. Travel pods are repurposed fuel tanks converted for pilot cargo storage during long flights, typically cross country or deployments. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Sean Martin/Released)

An F-16 Fighting Falcon pilot from the 100th Fighter Squadron arrives at the 407th Air Expeditionary Group in Southwest Asia, Oct. 16, 2017. In an air-to-surface role, the F-16 can fly more than 500 miles, deliver its weapons with superior accuracy, defend itself against enemy aircraft and return to its starting point. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Sean Martin/Released)

An F-16 Fighting Falcon pilot from the 100th Fighter Squadron arrives at the 407th Air Expeditionary Group in Southwest Asia, Oct. 16, 2017. In an air-to-surface role, the F-16 can fly more than 500 miles, deliver its weapons with superior accuracy, defend itself against enemy aircraft and return to its starting point. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Sean Martin/Released)

An F-16 Fighting Falcon pilot from the 100th Fighter Squadron fills out post-flight paperwork at the 407th Air Expeditionary Group in Southwest Asia, Oct. 16, 2017. In an air combat role, the F-16's maneuverability and combat radius exceed that of all potential threat fighter aircraft. It can locate targets in all weather conditions and detect low flying aircraft in radar ground clutter. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Sean Martin/Released)

An F-16 Fighting Falcon pilot from the 100th Fighter Squadron fills out post-flight paperwork at the 407th Air Expeditionary Group in Southwest Asia, Oct. 16, 2017. In an air combat role, the F-16's maneuverability and combat radius exceed that of all potential threat fighter aircraft. It can locate targets in all weather conditions and detect low flying aircraft in radar ground clutter. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Sean Martin/Released)

SOUTHWEST ASIA -- The 187th Fighter Wing deployed the 100th Fighter Squadron to the 407th Air Expeditionary Group, which began arriving in Southwest Asia Oct. 16.

While deployed it is known as the 100th Expeditionary Fighter Squadron and consists of several hundred Air Force members whose primary mission is to fly F-16 Fighting Falcons in support of Operation Inherent Resolve.

“For us to be able to do defensive counter air and try to maintain the political relations that we have, while supporting guys on the ground, is something we can do very well in the F-16,” said Maj. Marcus Landrum, 100th EFS director of operations. “Every component, every service, everybody that is fighting ISIS, we’re able to support.”

This is the first time the 100th EFS has deployed to the 407th AEG in several years. For a few of the Airmen, this is their first deployment.

“It’s pretty cool to finally do what I’ve been training many years to do,” said a captain with the 100th EFS as a pilot. “I think the most rewarding thing is, knowing that we a going to be directly helping our guys that might be in need.”

While helping out U.S. and coalition forces, the 100th EFS will continue on the legacy of the fighter pilots their squadron is known for: the Tuskegee Airmen, also known as the Red Tails.

“The significance of having the Red Tails out here is tying the Tuskegee heritage back to the 100th Fighter Squadron,” said Landrum. “We are continuing that legacy and that fight in the support of the Red Tails.”