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Senior Airman Richard Duckworth, 407th Expeditionary Operations Support Squadron, poses for a photo at the 407th Air Expeditionary Group, March 13, 2017. Duckworth was named the 332nd Air Expeditionary Wing’s outstanding performer for the week of March 12, 2017. (U.S. Air Force photo/Master Sgt. Benjamin Wilson)(Released) Red Tails Spotlight: Senior Airman Richard Duckworth
Senior Airman Richard Duckworth, 407th Expeditionary Operations Support Squadron, poses for a photo at the 407th Air Expeditionary Group, March 13, 2017. Duckworth was named the 332nd Air Expeditionary Wing’s outstanding performer for the week of March 12, 2017.
0 3/24
2017
Staff Sgt. William Enterkine, 407th Expeditionary Logistics Readiness Squadron vehicle operator, poses for a photo at the 407th Air Expeditionary Group, Feb. 20, 2017. Enterkine was named the 332nd Air Expeditionary Wing’s outstanding performer for the week of Feb. 19, 2017. (U.S. Air Force photo/Master Sgt. Benjamin Wilson)(Released) Red Tails Spotlight: Staff Sgt. William Enterkine
Staff Sgt. William Enterkine, 407th Expeditionary Logistics Readiness Squadron vehicle operator, poses for a photo at the 407th Air Expeditionary Group, Feb. 20, 2017. Enterkine was named the 332nd Air Expeditionary Wing’s outstanding performer for the week of Feb. 19, 2017.
0 3/08
2017
Tech. Sgt. Joseph Benoit, 407th Expeditionary Maintenance Squadron weapons specialist, tests the functionality of weapons rack releasing system of an F-16 Fighting Falcon at the 407th Air Expeditionary Group Feb. 4, 2017. The 407th Air Expeditionary Group is supporting Operation Inherent Resolve in the fight against the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant.  (U.S. Air Force photo/Master Sgt. Benjamin Wilson)(Released) It’s all about the hooks
Every Airman, however close to or far from the flightline, is working toward one singular goal – generating, executing and sustaining combat airpower. Each person on the installation does that differently by performing the duties required by his or her Air Force specialty, but the mission could not be accomplished effectively without every office working in sync with all the others.
0 2/06
2017
U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Tyler Harlow, 407th Expeditionary Operations Support Squadron air traffic control watch supervisor, poses for a photo at the 407th Air Expeditionary Group, Jan. 30, 2017. Harlow was named the 332nd Air Expeditionary Wing’s outstanding performer for the week of Jan. 29, 2017. (Photo by Master Sgt. Benjamin Wilson) Red Tails Spotlight: Staff Sgt. Tyler Harlow
Every 332nd Air Expeditionary Wing Airman is part of something greater than themselves. The wing's essential mission of generating, executing and sustaining combat airpower and combat search and rescue forces across the Levant counts on Airmen to bring their expertise and dedication to the fight. See below to learn more about Staff Sgt. Tyler
0 2/01
2017
U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Shaun McQuiston and U.S. Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Michael Hall, both 407th Expeditionary Security Forces Squadron, pose for a photo at the 407th Air Expeditionary Group, Southwest Asia Dec. 17, 2016. The expeditionary security forces unit uses active duty and reserve Airmen and Marines as well as Polish forces working together to keep the base secure.  (U.S. Air Force photo/Master Sgt. Benjamin Wilson)(Released) Citizen Airmen, Marines lead the way at 407th AEG
The U.S. Airmen and Marines of the 407th Expeditionary Security Forces Squadron are leading the way on their deployment with a truly collective approach to joint defense operations. Over the past decade, joint operations between U.S. sister services has become increasingly prevalent. So much so, that the joint environment has become the paradigm of comprehensive and effective battlespace ownership. What is unique about the base defense mission here is the integration of not only two U.S. sister services, but also a coalition partner, all under one, unified tactical control.
0 12/17
2016
(Courtesy graphic by Staff Sgt. Adam Ray) Embracing the warbird identity
As Airmen, know who you are and embrace that identity. If you don’t know the Group’s mission then you don’t know how to contribute. Finally, it doesn’t matter what your specialty is. What matters is the commitment you’re willing to make as a 407th Warbird.
0 12/17
2016
Default Air Force Logo Your network is your net worth
“Your network is your net worth.” That is a phrase that 2nd Lt. Victor Thompson once said to me when I was the Maintenance Flight Chief at Dyess Air Force Base. He was a U.S. Air Force Academy graduate and was a starting wide receiver on the football team. At the time he offered up that phrase to me, he didn’t have a vast amount of leadership experience and was very new to B-1 Lancer maintenance. Dyess AFB was his first base, and up to this point, he had done a short stint as the Fabrication Flight Officer in Charge, being tutored by a superb Senior NCO by the name of Buddy Manners. “Your network is your net worth,” is a phrase that I have repeated many times since, because I have found it to be a very helpful way to describe the importance of relationships in our line of business. Your network benefits not just you, but your Airmen, and this young lieutenant knew it.
0 12/16
2016
Default Air Force Logo How you do anything is how you do everything
I started looking around, trying to understand my environment when I reported to my first duty station in early 1993. I was stationed at McClellan Air Force Base, California, a member of the 55th Weather Reconnaissance Squadron. What was immediately and very apparent to me was that I looked very different that most of the other maintenance technicians. My BDUs were pressed and clean. My standard issue boots were polished. My haircut was in accordance with AFR 35-10 (old AFI 36-2903). I looked like a new guy. I felt like a new guy.
0 12/16
2016
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