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378th Operations, Maintenance Groups integrate

Maintenance Group and Operations Group merged for more dynamic operation.

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. David Ojeda, 555th Expeditionary Aircraft Maintenance Unit wepaons load team chief, loads munitions onto a U.S. Air Force Fighting Falcon at Prince Sultan Air Base, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, Feb. 10, 2020. Two expeditionary groups under the 378th Air Expeditionary Wing recently combined in order to implement a more dynamic, flexible and streamlined organizational structure. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Giovanni Sims)

Maintenance Group and Operations Group merged for more dynamic operation.

A U.S. Army soldier performs maintenance checks on a UH-60A Black Hawk helicopter at Prince Sultan Air Base, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, May 23, 2020. Two expeditionary groups under the 378th Air Expeditionary Wing recently combined in order to implement a more dynamic, flexible and streamlined organizational structure. (U.S. Air Force photo Staff Sgt. Giovanni Sims)

Maintenance Group and Operations Group merged for more dynamic operation.

U.S. Marine pilot assigned to the 214th Expeditionary Attack Squadron climbs into the cockpit of an AV-8B Harrier II at Prince Sultan Air Base, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, June 16, 2020. Two expeditionary groups under the 378th Air Expeditionary Wing recently combined in order to implement a more dynamic, flexible and streamlined organizational structure. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Giovanni Sims)

Maintenance Group and Operations Group merged for more dynamic operation.

A U.S. Marine crew chief launches an AV-8B Harrier II at Prince Sultan Air Base, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, June 16, 2020. Two expeditionary groups under the 378th Air Expeditionary Wing recently combined in order to implement a more dynamic, flexible and streamlined organizational structure. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Giovanni Sims)

Prince Sultan Air Base, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia --

The 378th Expeditionary Operations Group and the 378th Expeditionary Maintenance Group merged under the 378th EOG at the 378th Air Expeditionary Wing.

Recent restructuring of the 378th AEW has streamlined the wing structure down to only two groups at Prince Sultan Air Base, the 378th EOG and the 378th Expeditionary Mission Support Group, giving the wing a more dynamic, flexible and streamlined organizational structure.

“Each group has an experienced colonel and chief master sergeant to complete the leadership team,” said U.S. Air Force Col. Scott Hurrelbrink, 378th EOG commander. “This new composition allows for more centralized control by dividing operations and support into equal mission sets.”

The EOG is now hosts to three squadrons to include the 44th Expeditionary Fighter Squadron, the 378th Expeditionary Maintenance Squadron and the 378th Operations Support Squadron.

“We also have the additional benefit of the Marine AV-8B Harrier lls with the VMA-214th Marine Attack Squadron under the dynamic force employment model which the 378th EOG is proud to support and integrate with,” Hurrelbrink said.

While this change was implemented to create a more streamlined organizational structure, it has also created a positive impact on the missions at Prince Sultan AB.

“The integration of the operations and maintenance groups has improved our ability to deliver combat airpower to the combatant commander and joint forces commander,” Hurrelbrink said.

“This consolidation of the groups has allowed us to better understand each other,” added Col. Aaron Kiser, 378th EOG vice commander. “It's incredible to see the number of problem solvers and high-performing Airmen in this group. I'm amazed each and every day.”

Not only has this integration been good for the Airmen, but also for the leadership in charge.

“The new Operations Group has incorporated maintenance and munitions commanders, leaders, managers and experts with traditional operations oriented skillsets to collaborate and produce the best product--lethal combat airpower,” Hurrelbrink said. “Their abilities, integrity and selflessness are hallmarks of the 378th EOG.”

Hurrelbrink also expressed his honor to serve in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and to lead the 378th EOG at this critical juncture in history. The mission to deliver combat airpower and deliver strong relationships with the Royal Saudi Air Force would not happen without the people. The knowledge, expertise, passion and relentless drive make the mission in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia a great success.