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It takes a team: 386th ELRS ensure jet fuel storage

U.S. Air Force Airmen, from the 386th Expeditionary Logistics Readiness Squadron fuels management flight, work together to unroll a new empty fuel bladder at Ali Al Salem Air Base, Kuwait, Oct. 7, 2019. Fuel bladders are replaced every three-to-four years after they become unserviceable. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Daniel Martinez)

U.S. Air Force Airmen, from the 386th Expeditionary Logistics Readiness Squadron fuels management flight, work together to unroll a new empty fuel bladder at Ali Al Salem Air Base, Kuwait, Oct. 7, 2019. Fuel bladders are replaced every three-to-four years after they become unserviceable. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Daniel Martinez)

U.S. Air Force Airmen, from the 386th Expeditionary Logistics Readiness Squadron fuels management flight, Col. Rod Simpson, 386th Air Expeditionary Wing commander (second from right) and Chief Master Sgt. Jason Colon, 386th AEW command chief (third from right), drag an empty fuel bladder into position at Ali Al Salem Air Base, Kuwait, Oct. 7, 2019. An empty fuel bladder can weigh as much as 4,600 pounds. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Daniel Martinez)

U.S. Air Force Airmen, from the 386th Expeditionary Logistics Readiness Squadron fuels management flight, Col. Rod Simpson, 386th Air Expeditionary Wing commander (second from right) and Chief Master Sgt. Jason Colon, 386th AEW command chief (third from right), drag an empty fuel bladder into position at Ali Al Salem Air Base, Kuwait, Oct. 7, 2019. An empty fuel bladder can weigh as much as 4,600 pounds. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Daniel Martinez)

U.S. Air Force Airmen, from the 386th Expeditionary Logistics Readiness Squadron fuels management flight, and Col. Rod Simpson (second from right), 386th Air Expeditionary Wing commander, work together to drag a newly-unrolled fuel bladder into position at Ali Al Salem Air Base, Kuwait, Oct. 7, 2019. An empty fuel bladder can weigh as much as 4,600 pounds. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Daniel Martinez)

U.S. Air Force Airmen, from the 386th Expeditionary Logistics Readiness Squadron fuels management flight, and Col. Rod Simpson (second from right), 386th Air Expeditionary Wing commander, work together to drag a newly-unrolled fuel bladder into position at Ali Al Salem Air Base, Kuwait, Oct. 7, 2019. An empty fuel bladder can weigh as much as 4,600 pounds. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Daniel Martinez)

Leadership from the 386th Expeditionary Mission Support Group observe U.S. Air Force Airmen assigned to the 386th Expeditionary Logistics Readiness Squadron fuels management flight position a new empty fuel bladder in an open enclosure at Ali Al Salem Air Base, Kuwait, Oct. 7, 2019. Fuel bladders are capable of holding up to 210,000 gallons of fuel, ensuring continuous flight operations are possible and always fueled. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Daniel Martinez)

Leadership from the 386th Expeditionary Mission Support Group observe U.S. Air Force Airmen assigned to the 386th Expeditionary Logistics Readiness Squadron fuels management flight position a new empty fuel bladder in an open enclosure at Ali Al Salem Air Base, Kuwait, Oct. 7, 2019. Fuel bladders are capable of holding up to 210,000 gallons of fuel, ensuring continuous flight operations are possible and always fueled. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Daniel Martinez)

A U.S. Air Force Airman with the 386th Expeditionary Logistics Readiness Squadron fuels management flight loosens a strap on a new fuel bladder at Ali Al Salem Air Base, Kuwait, Oct. 7, 2019. Fuel bladders are replaced every three-to-four years after they become unserviceable. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Daniel Martinez)

A U.S. Air Force Airman with the 386th Expeditionary Logistics Readiness Squadron fuels management flight loosens a strap on a new fuel bladder at Ali Al Salem Air Base, Kuwait, Oct. 7, 2019. Fuel bladders are replaced every three-to-four years after they become unserviceable. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Daniel Martinez)

U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. Dale Bateman, 386th Expeditionary Mission Support Group vice commander, observes Airmen from the 386th Expeditionary Logistics Readiness Squadron fuels management flight position a new fuel bladder at Ali Al Salem Air Base, Kuwait, Oct. 7, 2019. Fuel bladders weigh as much as 4,600 pounds empty, but can weigh up to 1.4 million pounds when full. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Daniel Martinez)

U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. Dale Bateman, 386th Expeditionary Mission Support Group vice commander, observes Airmen from the 386th Expeditionary Logistics Readiness Squadron fuels management flight position a new fuel bladder at Ali Al Salem Air Base, Kuwait, Oct. 7, 2019. Fuel bladders weigh as much as 4,600 pounds empty, but can weigh up to 1.4 million pounds when full. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Daniel Martinez)

Chief Master Sgt. Sebrena Flagg-Briggs, 386th Expeditionary Logistics Readiness Squadron chief enlisted manager; Chief Master Sgt. Jason Colon, 386th Air Expeditionary Wing command chief and Lt. Col. Melissa Thurman, 386th ELRS commander, assist U.S. Air Force Airmen with the 386th ELRS fuels management flight, to position a fuel bladder at Ali Al Salem Air Base, Kuwait, Oct. 7, 2019. Fuel bladders are replaced every three-to-four years after they become unserviceable. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Daniel Martinez)

Chief Master Sgt. Sebrena Flagg-Briggs, 386th Expeditionary Logistics Readiness Squadron chief enlisted manager; Chief Master Sgt. Jason Colon, 386th Air Expeditionary Wing command chief and Lt. Col. Melissa Thurman, 386th ELRS commander, assist U.S. Air Force Airmen with the 386th ELRS fuels management flight, to position a fuel bladder at Ali Al Salem Air Base, Kuwait, Oct. 7, 2019. Fuel bladders are replaced every three-to-four years after they become unserviceable. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Daniel Martinez)

U.S. Air Force Airmen from the 386th Expeditionary Logistics Readiness Squadron fuels management flight finish positioning a new fuel bladder in an open enclosure at Ali Al Salem Air Base, Kuwait, Oct. 7, 2019. Fuel bladders are replaced every three-to-four years after they become unserviceable. Fuel bladders are capable of holding up to 210,000 gallons of fuel, ensuring continuous flight operations are possible and always fueled. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Daniel Martinez)

U.S. Air Force Airmen from the 386th Expeditionary Logistics Readiness Squadron fuels management flight finish positioning a new fuel bladder in an open enclosure at Ali Al Salem Air Base, Kuwait, Oct. 7, 2019. Fuel bladders are replaced every three-to-four years after they become unserviceable. Fuel bladders are capable of holding up to 210,000 gallons of fuel, ensuring continuous flight operations are possible and always fueled. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Daniel Martinez)

ALI AL SALEM AIR BASE, Kuwait -- U.S. Air Force Airmen, from the 386th Expeditionary Logistics Readiness Squadron fuels management flight, work together to unroll a new empty fuel bladder at Ali Al Salem Air Base, Kuwait, Oct. 7, 2019. Fuel bladders are replaced every three-to-four years after they become unserviceable. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Daniel Martinez)